Omega Seamaster Aqua Terra Series Blue Dial Water Resistant Fake Watches UK

Unveiled in 2002 as Omega‘s more leisurely sports watch, as opposed to the thoroughly athletic Seamaster Professional, the Seamaster Aqua Terra is now in its third generation – with the flagship being the weighty and pricey Worldtimer in platinum.

Despite being older the Aqua Terra has gotten better, with tighter lines, sharper detailing an the latest generation Master Chronometer movement. And most importantly, the new Aqua Terra watches cost marginally less than the equivalent models they replace.

The upgrades

The new Omega Aqua Terra fake watches UK retain its signature look, which is just slightly retro, but with nips and tucks to keep it fresh. While the new case swab retains the same outline, keeping the twisted lugs also found on the Speedmaster Moonwatch, it has been given a stronger form with more prominent angles, as well as a conical crown for better grip.

Similarly, the dial stays much the same, with “Broadarrow” hands and arrowhead hour markers. Also, the stamped linear motif on the dial inspired by teak decks of sailboats is now horizontal instead of vertical, and the text on the dial has been reduced by one line with the sensible elimination of the depth rating. At the same time the date window has been moved to six o’clock, giving the dial better symmetry.

Omega replica watches UK.

The automatic Omega fake Aqua Terra watches are now equipped with Master Chronometer movements – the cal. 8900 or 8901 in the men’s models and cal. 8800 for ladies – which contain all of Omega’s technical innovations, including the frictionless Co-Axial escapement designed by George Daniels that’s standard in many Omega watches.

More notable are the patented, non-magnetic alloys for the escapement parts and a silicon hairspring – together they give the movements a magnetism resistance of over 15,000 Gauss, an industry record and almost equivalent to the magnetic fields generated by a small MRI machine. And like all of Omega’s newest calibres, they are certified for timekeeping and functionality by METAS, the federal Swiss meteorological and measures organisation.

A lot to choose from

Over 60 versions of the new Aqua Terra are available, divided almost evenly between those for men and women. The men’s watches are available with 38mm or 41mm cases, while the women’s models can be had in 28mm, 34mm or 38mm sizes. The smallest, 28mm size is only available with a quartz movement.

Case materials range from steel to solid 18k Sedna gold, the proprietary Omega rose gold alloy that doesn’t fade with time, along with combinations of the two metals. The titanium case Aqua Terra has been done away with.

Will The New Omega Seamaster Blue Dial Stainless Steel Case Replica Waterproof Watches Be The Legend In UK

When the topic of luxury Omega watches UK brands comes to mind, Omega is likely one of this first you think of. Even if you aren’t into watches, chances are you are aware of the brand. Whether it’s because of their long and rich history, a relative who wears one, ubiquitous media, event sponsorship or James Bond uttering the word “Omeeega” on a train, they are a household name. Then, should you fall into the trap of becoming a watch enthusiast, it won’t be long until you find yourself with one on your wrist. They are one of those brands that are so core to the mythology of the modern watch, that it’s impossible to not be intrigued by their story and the watches they’ve created over the years.

For most people, the first Omega they will think of is the Speedmaster, and for good reason. The first watch worn on the Moon, it’s as iconic as a watch can be, still a mainstay for the brand, and has the unique feature of being largely unchanged for the last 50 years (the Speedmaster Professional, that is). It’s one of the few watches that is as much a cult classic as a popular success. But, it’s not the only watch the brand is known for, and this year at Basel 2017, Omega celebrated not only the Speedmaster, but two other significant watches that were released alongside it in 1957, the Seamaster 300 and the Railmaster with near visually identical, limited edition rereleases.

While not the Speedmaster in caché, the Seamaster 300 is certainly a well-known and regarded timepiece. Highly collectible and visually intriguing, it’s a big part of Omega’s history. The Railmaster, however, is a bit of an underdog. Alongside the Rolex Milgauss and IWC Ingenieur, it was one of a few watches released in the mid-twentieth century that dealt with the ever-growing concern of magnetism, specifically for railroad engineers and other professionals exposed to magnetic fields. By surrounding the watch’s movement in soft iron, they effectively created a Faraday cage, protecting against up to 1,000 Gauss or 80,000 A/m. (Interesting aside, Tissot is credited with making the first anti-magnetic wristwatch in 1929.)

While conceptually cool, the Railmaster wasn’t a big hit (neither was the early Milgauss) and the watch was discontinued in 1963. While its short lifespan denied the Railmaster the same prestige as its other “master” siblings, it does equate to high collectibility on the vintage market. Regardless, there it stayed in the archives until 2003, when it made a bit of an odd resurgence. Now under the Seamaster Aqua Terra line, the 2003 models were available in 36, 39, 42 and a monstrous 50mm (with a manual Unitas movement). The smaller versions were available with Omega’s new co-axial chronometer calibers. I’ll get to co-axial movements later, but these were among the first watches by the brand to sport this revolutionary technology created by George Daniels.

These Railmasters appear to have remained in the line for a longer time, eventually disappearing in 2012. While visually appealing and sticking to the design motif of the original, this era of the Railmaster had a significant conceptual flaw (though I doubt it played into their eventual retirement)–they had no consideration for magnetism. There was no soft iron cage shielding the co-axial escapement. Quite the opposite, in fact–they featured display case backs. It seems they were Railmasters because of their chronometer status–playing off of the idea of the railway watch–and dial design only.